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All of us would like to feel like we’re doing important work that makes a difference.

Dr. Lori Daniels

CURRENT LAB MEMBERS


Director and Postdoctoral Fellows

Dr. Lori Daniels

🇨🇦 Canada

Director of the UBC Tree Ring Lab, Professor

DEPARTMENT

Forest and Conservation Sciences

Research Gate Profile

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Position, Short Thesis Title or Interests

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Position, Short Thesis Title or Interests

professional_email@ubc.ca

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PhD Candidates

Kelsey Copes-Gerbitz

🇺🇸 United States

PhD Candidate, Wildfire Resilience in a Dynamic Ecocultural Landscape.

Co-Supervised by Dr. Shannon Hagerman with the Social-Ecological Systems Research Group.

kelsey.copes-gerbitz@ubc.ca

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uke-RXGc6CQ

Building on research and professional experience in Oregon (USA), England, and Morocco, I am an interdisciplinary researcher with interests in Indigenous epistemologies, historical ecology, forest landscape governance and dendro(pyro)chronology. In my current research, I am collaborating with the T’exelc (a Secwepemc First Nation), archaeologists, community forest managers, and wildfire experts in British Columbia to explore the ecological and cultural footprint of fire in a dry forest ecosystem through time. My interests in wildfire center around how different perspectives of fire shape decision-making, and the ways in which these decisions alter ecocultural landscapes and affect our capacity to coexist with fire.

Sarah Dickson-Hoyle

🇦🇺 Australia

PhD Candidate, Restor(y)ing fire-adapted landscapes: landscape change, Indigenous co-management and restoration in Secwepemcúl’ecw Landscapes.

Co-Supervised by Dr. Shannon Hagerman with the Social-Ecological Systems Research Group.

sarah.dickson-hoyle@ubc.ca

Google Scholar Profile
UBC Graduate Profile

I am an interdisciplinary social-ecological scientist with a background in ecology and community-based fire and natural resource management. I hold a dual BA (Geography)/BSc (Botany) and a Master of Forest Ecosystem Science from the University of Melbourne, Australia and have ten years of professional experience working in consulting, community not-for-profits and science and sustainability education.

My research is being conducted in partnership with the Secwepemcúl’ecw Restoration and Stewardship Society and its member Secwépemc First Nation communities to explore and inform Indigenous-led collaborative approaches to wildfire management and restoration of fire-adapted landscapes.

Gregory Greene

🇺🇸 United States

PhD Candidate, Wildfire Resilience in Dry Forests of British Columbia

map.n.trowel@gmail.com

Greene Forest Consulting
Research Gate Profile

I have worked professionally as a GIS analyst, computer programmer, archaeologist, and wildland fire fighter. I obtained a BSc in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. After working as “the GIS guy” for a while, I joined the Tree-Ring Lab and completed an MSc in Geography (Fire Ecology) at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Now, as a PhD Candidate, I am researching the effects of fire exclusion and historical logging on the resilience of British Columbia’s dry forest ecosystems. I also operate a business focused on fuel management in the BC interior; I specialize in quantifying forest fuel loads and modeling wildfire behavior.

PhD Students

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Position, Short Thesis Title or Interests

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professional_email@ubc.ca

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100 word biography in the first person, “I”, and action phrases.

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professional_email@ubc.ca

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Graduate Students

Jen Baron

🇨🇦 Canada

Graduate Student, Landscape Change and Wildfire Vulnerability in Southeastern British Columbia

j.baron@alumni.ubc.ca

Research Gate Profile
Google Scholar Profile

Originally from Winnipeg, I developed an interest in forest ecology while studying environmental science in southern Ontario. Today, I investigate global change impacts on forest structure and function through multiple lenses spanning ecology, geography, and earth systems science in the past and present. I take a systems approach to science that recognizes landscape level impacts across spatio-temporal scales. I have a strong affinity for data analysis and am always eager to discover new techniques for quantifying environmental patterns. I’m excited to integrate my past experiences with new techniques through my research in the Tree Ring Lab at UBC.

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Research Assistants

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Undergraduate Students

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Krystal Stone

🇨🇦 Canada

Undergraduate Co-op Sudent, Marine-Terrestrial Impacts of Climate Change on Coastal and Inland Riparian Ecosystems

krystal.stone@alumni.ubc.ca

Research Gate Profile

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eOcU7OmGLIA

I am a mature undergraduate student with a background in graphic design and visual arts. I am interested in the ways our oceans affect our forests, and how the health of below-ground ecosystems help to maintain a landscape’s complex adaptive system in the face of environmental change. I believe that sustainable practices are not only ‘good business’, but necessary for future generations. I support the autonomy and self-governance of indigenous people’s across the world, and believe that in order for future generations to survive we must shift away from disposable consumerism and towards a renewable degrowth economy. In the summer of 2020 I helped re-envision the Tree Ring Lab Website!

ALUMNI


Spencer Bronson

🇨🇦 Canada

Research Assistant (2017-2020), Climate related forest decline, wildfire history, dendrochronology, ecological restoration, forest dynamics, remote sensing

EDUCATION

Bachelor of Science (BSc) with Honours, Natural Resource Conservation

Progressing from volunteer to full-time technician, I have had the opportunity to engage in research covering a breadth of topics within the Tree-Ring Lab. From yellow-cedar decline in the coastal rainforests of Haida Gwaii to wildfire history reconstruction in interior BC, I have developed a set of skills and knowledge that has fostered a deeper passion for our forested landscapes. Representing the lab, I have been able to share my passion while training students, leading laboratory studies and teaching field schools on the applications of dendrochronology. My hard work helps to inform management decisions in our forest ecosystems.